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Friday, July 31, 2020 | History

2 edition of How to determine the number of Douglas-fir tussock moth eggs from egg mass weight found in the catalog.

How to determine the number of Douglas-fir tussock moth eggs from egg mass weight

R. C. Beckwith

How to determine the number of Douglas-fir tussock moth eggs from egg mass weight

by R. C. Beckwith

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  • 25 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Combined Forest Pest Research and Development Program in [Washington, D.C.] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Douglas fir tussock moth -- Eggs -- Counting.

  • Edition Notes

    Statement[by R. C. Beckwith, R. R. Mason, and H. G. Paul].
    SeriesAgriculture handbook -- 599, Agriculture handbook (United States. Dept. of Agriculture) -- no. 599.
    ContributionsMason, Robert R., Paul, H. Gene.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination6 p. :
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL22164098M

    Pupae were selected from uninfected families by weight (as above) and early-eclosing adults were used in limited mass-matings of 50 pairs in each of 3–8 mating chambers per sub-colony. The females from each chamber were pooled upon completion of egg laying, homogenized, and examined microscopically and by PCR for :// Seven outbreaks of Douglas-fir tussock moth, Orgyia pseudotsugata McDunnough, have recurred in the interior of British Columbia since But little is known about their impacts on renewable resources in affected stands. A study was undertaken to examine effects of the most recent outbreak on understory vegetation and tree productivity near Kamloops, British Columbia. Dry weight forage

    Nevertheless, Dwyer () provides indirect evidence that movement behaviour affects the risk that Douglas‐fir tussock moth larvae (Orgyia pseudotsugata) become infected with tussock–moth NPV. Similarly, Hails et al. invoke small‐scale spatial structure as a determinant of NPV transmission in the cabbage moth (Mamestra brassicae). The forest tent caterpillar, Malacosoma disstria Hübner (Lepidoptera: Lasiocampidae) is a native forest defoliator with a broad geographic range in North America. Forest tent caterpillars experience cyclical population changes and at high densities, repeated defoliation can cause reduced tree growth and tree mortality. Pheromone-based monitoring of forest tent caterpillar moths can provide

    Texas got an exemption to control rabid bats in October Between and , DDT was used to combat the pea leaf weevil and the Douglas-fir tussock moth in the Pacific Northwest; rabid bats in the Northeast, Wyoming, and Texas; and plague-carrying fleas in Colorado, New Mexico, and :// One of the earliest recorded outbreaks of Orgyia pseudotsugata (McDunn.) on white fir (Abies concolor) occurred at Mammoth Lakes, California, from to When a 5-acre plot was established there in to determine the effects of defoliation, it was shown that the infestation caused mortality (30% of the stand), growth loss and ://


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How to determine the number of Douglas-fir tussock moth eggs from egg mass weight by R. C. Beckwith Download PDF EPUB FB2

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Beckwith, R. How to determine the number of Douglas-fir tussock moth eggs from egg mass weight. Washington, D.C.: Dept. of Agriculture, Combined Forest Pest Research and Development Program, [] Get this from a library.

Douglas-fir tussock moth handbook: how to determine the number of Douglas-fir tussock moth eggs from egg mass weight. [R C Beckwith; R R Mason; H Gene Paul; United States. Department of Agriculture.; Combined Forest Pest Research and Development Program (U.S.)] REGRESSION FOR ESTIMATING NUMBER OF DOUGLAS-FIR TUSSOCK MOTH EGGS RELATIVE TO EGG MASS WEIGHT1 - Volume Issue 2 - Roy C.

Beckwith, R. Mason, H. Paul Abstract. Reproduction in female spruce budworms, Choristoneura fumiferana, entails sedentary oviposition early in life (gravid females with their heavy abdomen full of eggs are unable to sustain flight), followed by short- and long-range dispersal by females that have laid a portion of their size measurements (wing surface area and dry weight) of gravid females, spent females at The Douglas-fir tussock moth (DFTM), Orgyia pseudotsugata McDunnough (Lepidoptera:Erebidae:Lymantriinae), is a native western North American defoliator of true fir, Abies spp.

Mill., and Douglas   Female fir tussock moth (Orgyia detrita) rubbing setae from her abdomen onto her egg mass. Photograph by Donald W. Hall, University of Florida. Figure Fir tussock moth (Orgyia detrita) cocoon with egg mass covered with setae from female’s Mills NJ, Schoenberg F, Possibilities for the biological control of the Douglas-fir tussock moth, Orgyia pseudotsugata (Lymantriidae), in Canada, using natural enemies from Europe.

Biocontrol News and Information, 6(1) Morewood P, Gries G, Liska J, e. Douglas Fir Tussock Moth The Forest Service of USDA had an experimental use permit (EUP) for diflubenzuron to control the Douglas Fir Tussock Moth, a pest of the Pacific Northwest forests. At present no application is on file with the Agency for this proposed ://?Dockey=   How to determine the number of Douglas-fir tussock moth eggs from egg mass weight.

() AH How to determine the occurrence of virus in egg masses. () AH How to distinguish between old and new egg masses of the western spruce budworm. () AH How to estimate defoliation and predict tree damage. () AH The Douglas-fir tussock moth (Orgyia pseudotsugata McDunnough) defoliated Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var glauca [Beissn.] Franco), in British Columbia from to A common regression equation, representing data collected from four widely separated areas, was constructed to determine number of eggs of the Douglas-fir tussock moth based on individual egg mass   Eggs on the oviposition substrate were placed into new cages of the same design in which the hatched caterpillars were reared until pupation or until used in experiments.

We usually reared about 50 caterpillars per cage (or 30 for Plusiinae). Eggs obtained commercially were similarly :// The Douglas-fir tussock moth (DFTM), Orgyia pseudotsugata McDunnough (Lepidoptera:Erebidae:Lymantriinae), is a native western North American defoliator of true fir, Abies spp.

Mill., and Douglas-fir, Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco. We investigated the population genetics and impact associated with the first recorded outbreak of DFTM in southern California (USA), and report The mean weight, mortality rate and sex ratio were measured to estimate the total number of male and female moths in each collection.

The total number of moths for release was adjusted based on moth weight and mortality for each collection period with the aim of releasing the same number of APHIS and OXB moths of the same post-eclosion :// Get homework help fast.

Search through millions of guided step-by-step solutions or ask for help from our community of subject experts 24/7. Try Chegg Study today. Mortality from nuclear polyhedrosis virus (NPV) among gypsy moth, Lymantrla dispar (L.), neonates hatched from field-collected egg masses and larvae collected from the field was monitored at study AHHow to Determine the Number of Douglas-Fir Tussock Moth Eggs From Egg Mass Weight, by R C.

Beckwith, R. Mason and H. G Paul. AHTechniques for Monitoring the Effects of Insecticides on Forest Fauna, by Patrick J. Shea, Richard C. Reardon, and Stamford D Smith AHProtecting Ornamental and Shade Trees, by J P.

Lmnane and M.J Studies were conducted in British Columbia, Canada, and New Mexico in areas where the tussock moth (Orgyia pseudotsugata) had heavily defoliated white fir (Abies concolor) and Douglas fir to determine the relation between reserve energy and vigour of stressed trees.

Starch, a measure of reserve energy, was reduced in the twigs in proportion to the estimated defoliation of sapling-sized trees; th0 Douglas fir tussock moth in the Pacific fior4hwe/t A SEMINAR SEMINAR CHAIRMAN Henry J. Korp Deputy Assistant Administrator for Pesticide Programs U.S.

Environmental Protection Agency PROGRAM COMMITTEE Roger Pierpont, Entomologist Ecological Effects Branch, Criteria and Evaluation Division Office of Pesticide Programs, U.S.

Environmental Protection Agency Washington, D.C. Douglas ?Dockey= The primary host tree is Douglas fir, Pseudotsuga menziesii. Outbreaks occur periodically, at intervals of about 8–14 years, with noticeable defoliation usually lasting from 2–5 years.

Douglas-fir tussock moth infestations in the western United States were targeted by extensive chemical spray programs, primarily with DDT in the s to.

The Douglas-fir tussock moth (Orgyia pseudotsugata) is one of the most destructive forest defoliators of Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), grand fir (Abies grandis) and white fir (A. concolor) in western North America.

An outline is given of current pest-management programmes used in Oregon, which emphasize the annual monitoring of insects in forests with outbreak histories to determine A.E. Hajek, K. van Frankenhuyzen, in Microbial Control of Insect and Mite Pests, European Pine Sawfly Nucleopolyhedrovirus.

The European pine sawfly, N. sertifer, is a serious pest of pine in continental Europe and the British Isles (Huber, ). N. sertifer was first reported in New Jersey in but was not recognized as exotic untilby which time it had spread west /agricultural-and-biological-sciences/neodiprion-sertifer.The mean weight, mortality rate and sex ratio were measured to estimate the total number of male and female moths in each collection.

The total number of moths for release was adjusted based on moth weight and mortality for each collection period with the aim of releasing the same number of APHIS and OXB moths of the same post-eclosion ://?id=/